blumenwitz
supalove:

thinksquad:

This girl was crying and begging the policeman not to hit her or any of her friends. Then the policeman started crying as well and he said to her: “You just hold on girl.”
The photo comes from protests happening in Bulgaria right now. Students are protesting poverty and corruption in Bulgaria’s Socialist-backed government, chaining themselves to the doors of Sofia University and clashing with police outside of parliament.
After the photo was taken it quickly went viral

supalove:

thinksquad:

This girl was crying and begging the policeman not to hit her or any of her friends. Then the policeman started crying as well and he said to her: “You just hold on girl.”

The photo comes from protests happening in Bulgaria right now. Students are protesting poverty and corruption in Bulgaria’s Socialist-backed government, chaining themselves to the doors of Sofia University and clashing with police outside of parliament.

After the photo was taken it quickly went viral

lostnfoundinthesea

bootsnblossoms:

femininefreak:

Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman-Hughes, 1972 and 2014

Both by Dan Bagan

Wanna see my cry like a baby? Ask me who these women were.

Hughes’ father was beaten nearly to death by the KKK when she was a kid, and what does she do? Become an activist to try and stop that from happening to other people. She raised money to bail civil rights protesters out of jail. She helped women get out of abusive situations by providing shelter for them until they got on their feet. She founded an agency that helped women get to work without having to leave their children alone, because childcare in the 1970s? Not really a thing. In fact, a famous feminist line in the 70s was “every housewife is one man away from welfare.”

Then she teamed up with Steinman to found the Women’s Action Alliance, which created the first battered women’s shelters in history. They attacked women’s rights issues through boots on the ground activism, problem solving, and communication. They stomped over barriers of race and class to meet women where they were: mostly mothers who wanted better for themselves and their children.

These are women are who I always wanted to be.

lostnfoundinthesea
We never say that all men deserve to feel beautiful. We never say that each man is beautiful in his own way. We don’t have huge campaigns aimed at young boys trying to convince them that they’re attractive, probably because we very rarely correlate a man’s worth with his appearance. The problem is that a woman’s value in this world is still very much attached to her appearance, and telling her that she should or deserves to feel beautiful does more to promote that than negate it. Telling women that they “deserve” to feel pretty plays right in to the idea that prettiness should be important to them. And having books and movies aimed at young women where every female protagonist turns out to be beautiful (whereas many of the antagonists are described in much less flattering terms) reinforces the message that beauty has some kind of morality attached to it, and that all heroines are somehow pretty.

You Don’t Have To Be Pretty – On YA Fiction And Beauty As A Priority | The Belle Jar (via brutereason)

I struggle with this because as much as I absolutely believe we have to divorce ourselves from the idea that attractiveness/desirability directly correlates to worth, I also believe we have to give beauty/prettiness back to girls and women of Color, especially Black woc, who have been told our whole lives that no matter what we do, we will always be ugly and undesirable when compared with white women.

(via strangeasanjles)

darksilenceinsuburbia

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Christian Stoll

Psychology of Colors

  What color is “the love”? What exactly does the color black stand for? Is black a color? What color combination is reflecting “vanity” ?   I recently came across Eva Heller´s book ” Wie Farben wirken”,which examines the psychological effects and symbolisms of colors. Each color creates it´s own mental connection,and the combination of certain  colors in a specific percentage can reflect a feeling or a symbol. This series is illustrating 10 color combinations out of 200 you can find in the book.  (artist statement)